Recruitment process to benefit from employment law amendments

Employers across the UK are expected to hone their recruitment processes even more than they already are in a bid to make sure they hire exactly who they need the first time around. 

Changes to the traditional recruitment process are likely to be made by companies in a bid to keep in line with proposed changes to hiring and firing legislation put forward by Prime Minister, David Cameron.

His 'employee's charter', if passed, will allow employers to sack workers within two years of their hiring without facing the threat of an employment tribunal, and require employees seeking to take action against their employers to put down a financial deposit first. 

Recruitment manager for high street retailer New Look, Lee Evans, said the changes would make it all the more important for companies to get the right person in the job on the first attempt, so as to allow companies to grow better employee relations and avoid logistical battles.

The director general of the British Chambers of Commerce, David Frost, said that, among other things, the added flexibility would make companies looking to take people on more determined not to become complacent about their recruitment processes. He welcomed the recruitment amendments. 

"Year after year, business has said that private-sector job creation depends on giving employers the flexibility they need to hire and fire," he said. "We constantly argue that regulation is an increasing barrier to jobs growth. Despite this, successive governments have increased rather than decreased the burden." 

Geoff Newman, chief executive of online recruitment  company Recruitment Genius is more than aware of how current legislation prevents employers hiring saying "The current recession caused companies to lay off staff and become more resourceful. They ended up more profitable, without the hassle of employment legislation and wondering why they employed staff  in the first place. Hopefully these changes to legislation will stimulate employment as companies can get on with their business rather than the burden or red tape and prosecution from ridiculous claims."


 

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